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Key Tenants

LOUISIANA COASTAL PROTECTION & RESTORATION AUTHORITY

The Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority will relocate from rented offices in downtown Baton Rouge to a new building on The Water Campus. CPRA is implementing a $50 billion master plan for the Louisiana coast. The agency will house its 165-member team on the Campus. Implementing the coastal plan is estimated to produce up to 20,000 direct jobs and up to 25,000 indirect jobs through 2030.

LSU CENTER FOR RIVER STUDIES

Under construction in late 2014, the first building on The Water Campus will be a lab that allows scientists to create scale models of the lower Mississippi River. The lab will enable scientists to understand the highly complex interplay between land and water. Operated by LSU and funded by the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority, the $16 million lab will be built on a park at the Campus.

Scientists will use the lab for applied testing of new levees and barriers to better predict and prepare for rising seas. They will also study the real effects of surges on the eroding wetlands that buffer Louisiana against violent storms.

THE WATER INSTITUTE OF THE GULF

Built in the 1920s, the old Municipal Dock was left behind by advances in the shipping industry. This long-abandoned eyesore will be reinvented as a new 36,000-square-foot home for the Water Institute of the Gulf, and the icon of the Campus. The Institute was created in 2012 to study – and defy – the global crisis of disappearing wetlands. Scientists at the Institute are tackling tough questions, like how to build new land; which places along eroding coasts can be saved and which cannot; what can be done to help the threatened communities and preserve their cultures. The Institute provides the kind of unassailable science needed to guide Louisiana's $50 billion coastal plan.

Construction will break ground on the site in November 2015 to transform the old Municipal Dock into a $25 million, four-story contemporary facility for The Water Institute. Visible to more than 50,000 people crossing the Mississippi River Bridge into Baton Rouge each day, the Institute's building will not only facilitate vital research, but it will also include educational space devoted to teaching how they can adapt to the double peril of rising seas and disappearing deltas.